Food of the Etruscans?

MULTI GRAIN FIG/WALNUT/ROSEMARY FOCACCIA

Italy Magazine’s article about the multi grain pizza led me to their recipe for fig and honey focaccia. I’m a focaccia foodie and have made it every which way in past years to sell locally as a caterer. Now I hear it was invented by the Etruscans??!  My other haunting research topic!? Here is my recipe for fig and rosemary multi grain focaccia. I adapted Bob’s Red Mill recipe using his quality multi grain bread mix. You can up the oven temp if you wish

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 Adapted from BOB’S RED MILL 10-GRAIN HERB FOCACCIA

for Bread Machine or by Hand

Makes one 17×11” or two 10” loaves

1 c + 1 T warm water
3 T+2 T olive oil
3 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
2 T fresh (rosemary) herbs, chopped, or 3/4 tsp. dried–divided
1 Pkg. Bob’s Red Mill 10-Grain Bread Mix.
1 tsp. sea salt
1 tsp. cane sugar
2 tsp. active dry yeast
½ c ch. walnuts
10-12 dark figs sliced or 1 thinly sliced apple.
Coarse salt, for sprinkling

Put minced garlic, water, 1 T fresh herbs or 2 tsp dry herbs and 3 T oil into bread machine.  Add package of 10-grain bread mix and salt to bread machine.  Make well in center and pour in sugar and yeast.  Turn machine onto the dough cycle.  If dough is too dry in the machine, add water 1 T at a time.  Dough should begin to clump without remaining dough on sides of pan. Add ½ c chopped walnuts to recipe after dough is first mixed, and mixing.

When complete, remove dough that has already risen once.  Shape and roll, using remaining ¼ c flour, into desired round or rectangle bread sizes, move to prepared baking pans. Before rising again, press fig or apple rounds and additional ¼ c chopped nuts into dough, dimple and allow to rest, covered, for an additional hour.

Preheat oven to 425º with baking stone, if desired.

Dimple the dough with your fingertips.

Combine the remaining oil with the remaining herbs and brush over the top of the dough.  Sprinkle with salt.

Bake for 20 minutes, or until crisp and golden.  Cook on wire rack 15 minutes.

Can be frozen; allow to defrost, reheat wrapped in foil in 250ºF oven.

 

Whole Grain Berry Good “Rice” Pudding


Here’s another way to get your whole grains. Delicious in the morning or during any part of your day. This one is made with a whole grain medley from Bob’s Red Mill called “Grains of Discovery.”

Whole Grain Berry Good “Rice” Pudding


Serves 4-6

1 cup Whole Grain Medley* (Bob’s Red Mill “Grains of Discovery”)
3 cups whole milk, almond or coconut milk
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4  cup cane sugar

1/4  cup date sugar
1 tsp. cinnamon
1⁄2 tsp. cardamom

1 tsp. pure vanilla extract

Zest from one (1) lemon

1-2 cups strawberries (chopped) or blueberries
1/2 cup toasted walnuts, chopped (optional)

  1. Add grains, milk, salt, sugar and spices to a medium pot; stir to combine. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes or more until most of the liquid has absorbed and grains are tender, stirring occasionally.

  2. Remove from heat and stir in berries, vanilla, lemon zest and nuts, if using. Serve warm or at room temperature.

*Your own mix of grains can be substituted, e.g. quinoa, brown rice, whole grain oats, barley, buckwheat, etc.

Enjoy!

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Ancient Grains – Holy Moly!

And I thought I knew something about grains, flours, beans and seeds.

In looking through the “Breakfasts” cookbook Bob Moore autographed when he gave it to me, I found an A-Z tutorial: where grains’ names came from, and what they mean, if it is a grain, seed, grass, how old it is, how it was used, what nutritious powers it has, and other recommendations.   This cookbook has 100 healthy whole-grain recipes and is a brand-new addition to Bob’s Red Mill Natural Foods library of resources.   Many of the recipes are gluten-free and include options, tips, and other useful information at www.bobsredmill.com/recipes.

What does “steel cut” mean, if Bob’s Red Mill is so famous for “stone-ground” grains?

Once harvested, oats are transformed into a wide variety of products.  The whole kernels (toasted and hulled after harvest) are oat groats (whole oats).  Chopped into tiny pieces, groats become steel-cut oats (Irish or pinhead oatmeal).  When stone-ground into coarse bits, groats are called Scotch oats or Scottish oatmeal.  Or, the groats might be “rolled” or “flattened” as in the cases of rolled oats or quick-cooking oats.  Bob’s Red Mill offers 5 Gluten-Free Oat products, and 10 additional oat products.

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Oats are highly susceptible to contact with gluten-containing grains during planting, harvest, transport and milling.  Bob’s Red Mill gluten-free, dedicated buildings isolate the products and store them in dedicated silos.  Each shipment is tested throughout the process to ensure that their purity meets rigid international gluten free standards.